Guest Spots: “Texas Boys”

Kiotti f/ Mr. 3-2, Pimp C – “Texas Boys

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from Jag in The Jungle (Maddvibes, 2001)

You will have to excuse me, but I’m not too up on Kiotti. Other than fact that he reps Houston and sounds a lot like Mystikal I don’t know much about the dude, so feel free to educate me in the comments.

What struck me most about this track is the fact that Pimp sounds really cut and pasted into it—the “uh” ad-libs and the hook suffer the most, I think. Since Jag in the Jungle dropped around the same that Pimp was locked up, that probably explains it.

Regardless, “Texas Boys” is a good track and it’s cool to hear Pimp rapping on the same track as 3-2, since he was the “unofficial” third member of UGK during the Super Tight era… nostalgia and all that shit.

 

Guest Spots: “Filthy Child (Remix)”

Bowtie f/ Pimp C, Polarbear – “Filthy Child (Remix)

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from Son of a Junkie (Flight Risk, 2001)

Unfortunately, I don’t have a lot of info on this Bowtie dude, except that Son of a Junkie was released in 2001 through Flight Risk Records. (If you know more, by all means, hit the comments!) I was kind of surprised when I peeped the track list and saw that it includes a few big name features besides Pimp C: Kool G. Rap and LA the Darkman guest on one track and Royce Da 5’9″ shows up on another.

Anyway, this remix to “Filthy Child” closes out the album, with guest verses from the album’s executive producer Polarbear and Pimp C, who also pulls double duty as producer and hook man. The beat isn’t too different from the original version, but Pimp gives his rendition a much more Southern, bass heavy twang which sets it apart.

 

Long Live the Pimp

UGK f/ Z-Ro – “Trill N*ggas Don’t Die”

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from Underground Kingz (Jive, 2007)

#RIPPimpC, #UGK4Life

More to come later, as usual. It’s a celebration.

 

Rarities: Banned (FLAC Rip)

I recently got my hands on the OG pressing of UGK’s Banned EP, so I thought I would share. For the uninitiated among you, check out my original post about the EP here for essential background information.

I will admit though that I’m not entirely sure where my copy falls in terms of pressings of the EP. The CD matrix numbers don’t match the ones listed on either of its Discogs or RapMusicGuide entries and the disc art is slightly different. I don’t think that my copy is a dusty ass bootleg or one of the early 2000s BigTyme pressed reissues, but pressing information on this EP is so damn scarce that I just can’t be 100% sure.

But in any event, this rip is worlds ahead of the cassette rip I posted two years ago. For completion’s sake and historical reference, I’ve also included hi-res scans of the booklet, inlay, and CD.

TRACKLIST:

  1. Intro
  2. Pregnant Pussy
  3. Pusi Mental
  4. Muthafucka Ain’t Mine
  5. Muthafucka Ain’t Mine (Instrumental)

Click here to download.

 

Guest Spots: “Dat Good”

Mr. Marcelo

Mr. Marcelo f/ Pimp C, Prince Bugsy – “Dat Good

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from Son of Magnolia (Ball or Fall, 2006)

Mr. Marcelo is a rapper born and raised in the Magnolia Projects of New Orleans, Louisiana who takes his rap name from local crime boss Carlos Marcello. Like his younger brother Curren$y, Marcelo was a No Limit Records signee in the early 2000s and released his debut album Brick Livin’ in 2000. Though it received pretty positive reviews, it didn’t chart very well: it only placed #172 on the Billboard Top 200 (which still isn’t bad for a third-string, late-era No Limit release).

He left No Limit not too long afterward, and went on to release his sophomore album Streetz Got Luv 4 Me through Tuff Guys Entertainment in 2001 and his third album Still Brick Livin’ through his own label, Brick Livin’ Entertainment, in 2004. His third album, Son of Magnolia, was released in 2006 on Ball or Fall Records. He has also put out some mixtapes through his label as well.

The majority of Son of Magnolia was produced by Avery Jones, which includes “Dat Good” with Pimp C and Prince Bugsy (a Bay Area rapper by way of Shreveport, LA and a Ball or Fall Records signee). Another member of the Ball or Fall Records roster, Louis XIV, does the track’s hook.

 

Rarities: “Free (Sampler Version)”

Pimpalation Sampler

Pimp C – “Free

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from Pimpalation sampler (2006, Rap-A-Lot)

I never realized it until last night when I was listening to the Pimpalation album sampler, but the version of “Free” that appears on the actual album is censored. I guess Tom Petty couldn’t appreciate the art in having Pimp cuss all over one of his songs. I guess you can call it “Ain’t That a Bitch B****” Syndrome.

Anyway, this is just a minute-or-so long snippet unfortunately, but the intro and first verse here are completely uncensored, so that’s something at least. #RIPPimpC

 

Guest Spots: “Pop the Trunk”

The G Filez

Celly Cel f/ UGK – “Pop the Trunk

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from The G Filez (1998, Jive)

This is probably one of my favorite UGK guest spots. Celly, Bun, and Pimp all come hard (no homo) and Studio Ton’s beat knocks. UGK sound comfortable as hell rapping on this beat, and it kinda makes me wish they would have rapped over more Bay Area style production.

Anyway, this joint was apparently the third single off Celly’s The G Filez album but I don’t think it ever charted or anything, which is a shame as far as I’m concerned.